How To Tell The Difference Between Fake Silver And Real Silver

Silver jewellery is often underrated, but a true connoisseur is going to recognise its value. Silver is not as famous as its cousin, gold, nor as expensive, but it still renders a good and steady value, which makes it a great investment. Another similarity with gold is you have to know how to tell the difference between fake silver and real silver before placing your money on the table.

Sterling Silver and Simple Silver
Sterling and Silver essentially mean the same thing, but there are cases when the latter is used to refer the colour of an item. When the seller is only saying silver, it usually means the item is coloured in silver; only when it specifies Sterling Silver, you can be sure the silver jewellery is made of silver.

Investing in silver
Sterling silver has a changing value on the market and purchasing handcrafted silver jewellery or vintage items should not affect the market value of the pieces. However, when you want to invest for financial return you should be purchasing bars of silver, which can be cashed in when their value increases and bought when they have a low value. With sterling jewellery you are paying for the beauty of the piece and the crafting process.

Silver Pieces Markings
Sterling silver jewellery carries a mark: .925. This means that 925% of the item is made with 1000 pure silver. There is a very rare piece which carries a 999 mark, but as silver is rather soft; anything beyond 925 would make the crafting process really hard. The only exception to the marking rule is Native silver, which was not made to be sold to the general public. When you come across a piece which doesn’t have any mark and the seller claims to be tested, you should be staying away from it, as the chances for it to be a forgery are very high. The same goes for strange markings, which seem to be made in a rush, by amateurs.

Have a Good Magnet and a Jeweller’s Loop with You
When you are going to buy silver, make sure you have the tools to help you make the difference between sterling silver and fake silver. A jeweller’s loop helps you read the 925 marking on the jewellery. A magnet also helps you make the difference between sterling silver and other combos which resemble it. You need to have a strong magnet – the random fridge magnet is not going to help you in this case – and hover it on the silver piece. If the item is not moving, it might be silver. Combinations of silver and copper or else are going to jump off the table to the magnet. However, aluminium and stainless steel are not attracted by the magnet either, so don’t rely solely on the magnet test when you buy silver.

Research and Keep a Sharp eye on Anything you Buy
Research the vendor and the merchandise before buying, as there are many people who sell fake silver pieces out there. Prior to a certain year, the laws didn’t ask for the 925 marking; if the marker had registered his mark, it was enough to certify the pieces he was selling were sterling silver. Another point to consider is that other countries have different laws when it comes to sterling silver and they might not ask for the pieces to carry the 925 mark. The best way to protect your investment is to research the seller and his products and test them with the jeweller’s loop and the magnet. Having a trustful seller to rely on also helps a lot.

Let’s Learn About Diamonds- Fundamentals Of Diamond Grading

Silver Jewellery

The most important perquisites for achieving maximum precision in diamond grading include:

→ Precise and standardized terminology and descriptive norms.

→ A well-graduated colour comparison set.

→ A series of proven practical techniques as well as knowledge in the use of equipment and technical aids.

→ Includes thorough cleaning of the stone before work starts, so that you can determine with certainty whether you have dust on the surface or interior inclusions.

→ A great deal of practical experience. Training must be underpinned with experience and knowledge.

→ Good eyesight is the most important and most valuable grading instrument required to observe the most minute characteristics, using either loupe or microscope magnification, to distinguish the slightest     colour nuances.

→ Patience is another very important personal trait that makes a good grader!

Especially at the begging, grading even one brilliant can easily last up to one hour.

In a gemmological laboratory with experienced professional graders who grade diamonds on daily basis, 20 stones every day means around 20 minutes per stone, which is a good work quota.diamond

DIAMOND GRADING ALSO MEANS:

→ Objectivity

→ Integrity

→ A sense of responsibility

→ Concentration

→ Stamina

→ Attentiveness

Today at the world’s leading diamond laboratories, several graders acting independently of one another working on the anonymity principle and having no knowledge of the client, are always used to perform colour, clarity and cut grading. The certificate is only issued after several experienced graders have come to the same conclusion.

In addition, internal tests, so-called “series tests”, are conducted on a regular basis.

These tests are performed on a series of test diamonds, which are handled in the same way as stones for other clients and which are subjected to exactly the same evaluation procedure. The graders of course do not know that the stones are being evaluated for test purpose.

These “series tests”, which are always performed on the same series of diamonds, are performed regularly. The objective is to check whether over a period of several years graders arrive at a different rating of the same diamond due, for example, to impaired eyesight or declining powers of concentration.

In other words, a diamond that has already been graded should be given the same quality rating when it is graded, again by the same individual.

Heileig diamonds sells diamonds which are graded by world’s renowned laboratories such as GIA, IDI, IGI and HKD.

Heileig diamonds caters direct customers and jewellers across Australia in diamond and gold jewellery, certified solitaire, melee, stars and pointers.